Words from a Father

Husband of One, Father of Four

Tag: research

458. Anti-theist Rage

It is hypocritical for an anti-theist to rage about God commanding slaughter at a few defined instances in the Bible, yet they do not rage against the perpetual daily slaughter of innocent children by abortion.

457. Explain Pro-choice

A difficult moment for a pro-choice advocate comes when they try to explain to an eight year old exactly what it is they are supporting.

445. Myopic Arrogance

Myopia worsens with increased arrogance.

419. Knowledge Fails

The old joke goes like this. A communist says he can put a new suit on that man. Christianity says it can put a new man in that suit.

We have access to more knowledge, experience, history, culture, research, philosophy, political stances, art, and plain old information than ever before in time. Yet we are no better for it. It is past time to admit that information and access have failed to produce better people, as was hoped by the likes of Marcus Aurelius and others. Neither external forces nor accessibility can ever change a person within. Permanent and positive change begins only inside the human being, and that is precisely what Christianity — and no other religion or philosophy or political stance — promises.

418. Utopian Emptiness

Often we hear something along the lines of, “Someday technology or science will help us with or prove that fill-in-the-blank-with-whatever.” This is the definition of faith. Hopeful of some abstract future, the present problems are dismissed rather than dealt with in any real way.

This is like promising tomorrow’s stunning sunrise to the blind.

399. Dictionary

Dictionaries are imperative. There’s a difference between bodacious, salacious, and pugnacious.

396. Essay: Argumentation Categories

I believe there are four main categories of argumentation, with one subcategory that is combined as needed with the primary four:

  1. Religious: Either defending or vilifying the authority of spiritual works.
  2. Rousing: Appeals made on emotional grounds. Generally, these are smokescreens and hold negligible weight upon scrutiny. Because each side displays equal passion and because riling emotions is not the front where progress can be made, emotional arguments should be swept away almost immediately. This includes sarcasm and verbal sparring.
  3. Reasoning: Logical progressions, syllogisms, comparisons and contrasts, philosophy, and the like.
  4. Research: Clinical studies and meta-analyses. These, however, do not reflect true daily situations and cannot account for every possible variable.
  • Reality: The undeniability of our human experience; existentialism in its true meaning; what we go through each day. This subcategory is reflected in some of the arts — music, movies, poetry and such — and fits easily with the prior categories and can be used to support them at will.

Though, for instance, the religious may use their sacred text more and the analytical may use research more and the ignorant may use sarcasm more, all sides utilize all four categories to undergird their perspective. They are wise to do so. No single category can solve a disagreement, but cumulatively they clarify each perspective overall.

Know when and when not to use each.

383. Beliefs

A person’s beliefs form the basis of everything they do. That is why knowing a person’s beliefs is of utmost importance.

Know what you believe, but, more importantly, why you believe those things are true. Those answers will define how you live and the choices you make.

370. Punctuate for Intended Meaning

There are right and wrong ways to punctuate your writing.

Once you master those rules, move to the next level. Phrase and punctuate so readers grasp your intended meaning. This is the beginning of developing your personal writing style.

366. Self-taught

Make self-taught a way of life.

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