Words from a Father

Husband of One, Father of Four

Tag: ethics

455. Consequential Loss

Some consequences are so delayed or unanticipated, by the time they take effect there is no way to correct your choice. One of the worst things in this situation is the amount of loss suffered before the consequences even begin.

452. Quotes: Benjamin Nolot on Justice

“The violent and the oppressor do not need to be psychoanalyzed, they need to be stopped.”

— Benjamin Nolot, documentary filmmaker of Nefarious: Merchant of Souls

444. Logical Life

If a scientist found one single cell on a neighboring planet, they would declare that they had found life.

We should celebrate all the same when we recognize the greater and more certain life growing within a pregnant woman.

This is not open to debate: Pregnancy is life, abortion is death. Science is not silent on this matter, and anyone trying to make the issue subjective or anything less than clear-cut is simply not dealing with the overwhelming facts.

422. Essay: Morals, Ethics, and Laws at the World’s End

Morals, ethics, and laws are three different things.

Morals come from a divine source; they are foundational and, it could be argued, absolute regardless whether we agree with them and abide by them or not. Ethics are mankind’s way of codifying standards apart from a divine source, whether springing from a philosophy that is utilitarian, practical, altruistic, lack of purposeful harm, social contract, or what have you. Ethics are circumstantial. Laws are the details, whether coming straight from the undercurrent of moral absolutes via ethics, or coming from ethics without explicitly acknowledging moral codes. Either way, it’s a trickle down from the immovable to the detailed. Separating them this way helps me see them a bit clearer.

All ethical codes and laws are of temporal good, not eternal good; that’s the purpose moral absolutes serve. Ethical codes and laws will always eventually be shown futile because — and this is key — they do not change a person on the inside, but only recommend restraint of outward actions. True restraint, however, only comes from within, thus the emphasis on “internalizing” whatever ethical code one takes as their own. Think of all the laws passed in a city. Now imagine that city has suffered a cataclysm. No amount of signs reminding people not to steal will matter one bit; it’s every person for themselves. But no worry in imagining; it’ll happen again in just a little while. The world doesn’t go for too long in a state of meek stasis because we still haven’t been changed on the inside.

Now fast-forward to the end of the world as our solar system rips apart by colliding with another. If all is lost at that point, which laws matter and which do not? The correct answer from the anti-theist is that none of them do except as a form of control, a form of social etiquette. But when the earth’s mantle is caving in, etiquette matters not.

When did those laws cease to matter? A day before the cataclysm? A month? Five years or a thousand years before? There’s no clear time when they would be futile, so they shouldn’t matter now. It truly is just a matter of time. Let’s not begrudge a few moments here or there when the universe is winding down to its eventual heat death.

Laws are not an objective — immovable — standard. Whenever someone sees fit to break a law, they will and with little consequence. But breaking a moral injunction is akin to disemboweling your own conscience. The consequences are internal and they are grave, eventually spilling out over your stumbling feet. Without an objective moral standard, we tug at the fragile strings of what it means to be human, not realizing it is the cord holding back the hand with Dorian Gray’s dagger. Pull too hard and the youth dies in anguish with nothing but the remnants of a ruined life painted for all to see.

While each decade seems to display mankind’s increased ruination, keeping objective moral standards in place is our only saving grace. At the world’s end only an objective moral standard has enough impetus upon the human heart for right action, and that only comes from God, along with His promised strength to accomplish it.

410. Careful Gains

Better to gain rightful enemies than wrongful loyalties.

409. Entertainment’s Depravity

Entertainment has exhausted the drama of the bad person doing wrong. Sadly, they now try to convince us that there are few who are truly bad and there is little truly wrong.

396. Essay: Argumentation Categories

I believe there are four main categories of argumentation, with one subcategory that is combined as needed with the primary four:

  1. Religious: Either defending or vilifying the authority of spiritual works.
  2. Rousing: Appeals made on emotional grounds. Generally, these are smokescreens and hold negligible weight upon scrutiny. Because each side displays equal passion and because riling emotions is not the front where progress can be made, emotional arguments should be swept away almost immediately. This includes sarcasm and verbal sparring.
  3. Reasoning: Logical progressions, syllogisms, comparisons and contrasts, philosophy, and the like.
  4. Research: Clinical studies and meta-analyses. These, however, do not reflect true daily situations and cannot account for every possible variable.
  • Reality: The undeniability of our human experience; existentialism in its true meaning; what we go through each day. This subcategory is reflected in some of the arts — music, movies, poetry and such — and fits easily with the prior categories and can be used to support them at will.

Though, for instance, the religious may use their sacred text more and the analytical may use research more and the ignorant may use sarcasm more, all sides utilize all four categories to undergird their perspective. They are wise to do so. No single category can solve a disagreement, but cumulatively they clarify each perspective overall.

Know when and when not to use each.

378. Quotes: Your Dad on Great Art

“Great art does not push aside the moral boundaries of the past, it pushes the art form forward. I do not believe that safe and status quo films, though decently acted, should garner awards. Those films which push the art form forward and add to its rich heritage should attain that distinction.”

—Your Dad

373. Vices Enslave

There is no slavery so entrenching as any activity or motivation that is the opposite of virtue.

358. Quotes: Your Dad on Unreasonable Expectations

“You cannot expect someone else to live according to your belief system any more than they should expect that of you.”

—Your Dad

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